Not Knowing

There is a fullness by the end of the day after multiple meetings and listening to peoples’ stories.  Listening happens in the moment, but often the seeing comes later.  It’s the timely answer to prayers for wisdom and discernment when needed.  Until then, there may simply be a not knowing.

Not knowing what each day will hold . . . (Matthew 6:34 “Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself.  Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.”)

Monday – Crossing a bridge not knowing if it will hold up, privileged to drive a couple of hours to meet a long-time friend (a college student 12 years ago,  now a married man with 3 children and a demanding legal job), privileged to wait for about an hour of his time, and privileged to reconnect and encourage each other.  He was the one listening to a story that really began before the last September 2017 visit – a story full of gaps and unanswered questions about a  Bible school student who appears to have been forgotten in prison for 16 months, seemingly falsely accused of the murder of a man who owed him some money.  A few are looking for a way to help, believing he’s innocent, apparently set up by the victim’s family.  This old friend is willing to make time to meet with another legal friend who may be able to help.  There may be some unknowns to this story, some small possible evidence of possible guilt.  For now, there is a lot of listening and a not knowing . . .

Tuesday:  Arrived to the Association meeting, not knowing it was not an association meeting, but a very long, long, long meeting about how to evangelize.  There are some disadvantages to not knowing . . .

Wednesday:  Not knowing I was going to be asked to preach this Sunday, pictures taken of some pages from a commentary come in handy!  And, youth conference leaders are preparing to buy beans in bulk for food for the big youth conference in January.  Buying beans soon will cut costs because beans are cheaper in the Fall than in January.  Seeing the cost of not knowing the cycle of growing and harvesting beans.

Thursday:  Pastor Charles is training some of the leaders in the Association.  Teaching Bible study methods to men not knowing what to look for as they study is valuable to the local churches. They learned the importance of looking for repeated words, how to examine the verses that encapsulate the idea – verses before and after, to give a summary of the passage in their own words and to talk about the context prior to and after the passage.  Not knowing what Pastor Charles was doing, I was encouraged at the training and growth taking place.

Friday:  Often I awake to a sudden “seeing” of what I heard the day before.  This time it was the words of Pastor David explaining he was leaving early to attend to a burial for a young woman near his village – she left behind a 5-month old baby.  One of Pastor David’s daughters is trying to help care for the baby.  Not knowing what to feed the baby if there is no mother’s milk, she is offering porridge to the baby.  The baby is not doing well.  Now I know what to do – purchase formula and some bottles and do my best to explain how to use clean water (water that has been boiled), clean bottles, and how to measure and mix the formula to feed the baby.  I saw this bring health back to a baby’s life in a village a few years ago.

Today:  We plan to drive to Paidha.  Not knowing how long it will take to plant the peanuts in the field before we leave – the peanuts must be planted because of the timing of the rain.  It may be about 2:00 . . . about-ish, maybe, but sometime today . . . or evening.

Knowing God is faithful!  So thankful God always knows and His timing is always right.  So thankful He provides insight and wisdom and discernment when needed.

One thought on “Not Knowing

  1. Tomorrow is always an unknown in Uganda, often resulting in anxious anticipation or quiet contemplation for each coming day. Hal, I put you in the anxious anticipation camp.

    Dana

    Liked by 1 person

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